Hardcover Ö Real Life PDF æ

find this review others on my blog This review would be a lot easier to write if Brandon Taylor weren t so good Real Life was like a crush, an obsession It seemed almost to beckon me like a half curled hand, and when I finished reading it, I sat in the state of suspension that often comes over me at the end of a particularly good book, the sense of coming slowly back to awareness of the world outside my mind, and finding it echoing with a quiet that wasn t so much silence, but sound find this review others on my blog This review would be a lot easier to write if Brandon Taylor weren t so good Real Life was like a crush, an obsession It seemed almost to beckon me like a half curled hand, and when I finished reading it, I sat in the state of suspension that often comes over me at the end of a particularly good book, the sense of coming slowly back to awareness of the world outside my mind, and finding it echoing with a quiet that wasn t so much silence, but sound turned inside out.On the surface, Brandon Taylor s debut novel, Real Life , is the story of a gay black biochemistry student named Wallace from a small town in Alabama studying in an unnamed, predominantly white Midwestern university But that barely touches the experience of reading this novel.The first element that makes Real Life so distinctive is the writing Taylor has an unerring talent for acutely translating emotion into concrete sensation to slide readers into his character s space, where they experience everything from the inside Taylor s descriptions have shores, depths, a purpose and a shape they re not just formless and opaque, stretching out to every horizon He writes as if he is closing his eyes and imagining he was opening other eyes that would look inward instead of out But as fine and vivid as that deep soul probe is, Taylor zooms outward just as deftly, marking everything, no detail too small to escape his notice reflecting Wallace s own tendency to see himself in every aspect of existence around him This, I think, is the kind of prose that wants to bethan just read It wants to be heard and tasted and felt The kind that slides between your ribs, and opens you up like a reliquary full of old, forgotten memories.Taylor peeks into Wallace s state of troubled, quiet aloneness with both rigor and poetic license A mind is a place a landscape, a wilderness, a city, a world that you could pace in endless, restless circuits and never find its edges And Wallace s is a world unto itself pulled tight and secretive, his thoughts sinking deep, undetected, like underground water You are so determined to be unknowable, one of his friends feeling like he could noreach Wallace than he could fly into the air tells him at one point But no matter how good the mind is at hiding things, it cannot erase them It can only conceal, and concealed things are not gone.I saw myself in Wallace, in the weariness to his edges, like fraying cloth It was as though Wallace s character evoked in me something that had the size and shape of a memory, but inversed or pulled inside out I recognized in his manner a familiar loneliness, a forlornness That unbearable claustrophobia of the soul that comes through with powerful clarity in this novel no walls to throw an echo back, you clap and clap, but nothing answers back It was hard to keep reading at times, as though with every page, I left something essential of me behind.Taylor captures it all, with devastating honesty and vulnerability Wallace s longing for a person, for a world, for a sense of self The remembered violence of his past which he was in most agony to hide, but which was working its way into every crevice of his life, transmuting itself into an all pervasive self hatred and shame The sadness in his anger, the guardedness of his grief over his recently dead father A need growing inside his chest like a fruit splitting its rind to shed his skin, snakelike, and fling himself into the seething unknown Wallace s lust, and his tremulous relationship with Miller which had a wild, manic quality to it something hectic and unhinged and a little perilous about it Academia, and how it was twofold for Wallace it sidelined him Wallace feels bottlenecked in the narrow halls of his predominantly white school, pressed together like tinned fish with people waiting for him to set foot in an unpropitious spot and prove their assumptions about him , but it also shepherded him It was the invisible nautilus shell protecting him from the world, hope laced and cruel, and if he should lose it, he might not survive his life Real Life is also a razor sharp exploration of how people can live shoulder to shoulder yet remain invisible to each other There is an edge to Wallace, a hard collision with life, that his friends and colleagues most of whom are white hadn t known in their soft cocoons Micro aggressions are examined so familiar that my heart often felt like someone had touched a lit match to it and midway through Real Life , Wallace makes a painful observation There will always be this moment There will always be good white people who love him and want the best for him but who areafraid of other white people than of letting him down His friends might listen, and nod, but the doors behind their eyes are closed, and their complacent silence proves to be as much a violation as a black eye, or a sprained wrist None of this is fair, writes Taylor, None of this is good, Wallace knows But he also knows that the point is not fairness The point is not to be treated fairly or well The point is to get your work done The point is results That is the tyranny of real life.In those passages and so many others like it, we see the purifying rage of Taylor s prose The novel offers itself up, bare and vulnerable, for its readers so they don t have to take on the daunting task of finding language to make sense of what they are feeling We live in a culture that makes such little effort to understand the experiences of queer people of color, let alone help us understand our own But Real Life is a scream that ensures visibility It rings a bell deep inside, striking a resonant, vibrating note that makes you nod yes with recognition.Sensual, defiant, and highly inward, this fiercely honest debut will linger long past the last page A must read ko fi blog twitter tumblr Though it pains me to write it, this book and I just did not fit well together much at all I appreciate some of what it portrays, the struggles of Wallace, a gay black biochemistry graduate student living in the Midwest Brandon Taylor does an excellent job of showing the anger and then learned helplessness Wallace experiences due to overt and subtle racism throughout the book Wallace s sadness from his trauma with his family, from the racism he encounters, from feeling invisible and isolate Though it pains me to write it, this book and I just did not fit well together much at all I appreciate some of what it portrays, the struggles of Wallace, a gay black biochemistry graduate student living in the Midwest Brandon Taylor does an excellent job of showing the anger and then learned helplessness Wallace experiences due to overt and subtle racism throughout the book Wallace s sadness from his trauma with his family, from the racism he encounters, from feeling invisible and isolated in his small town cuts deep and feels real Though also a major frustration of mine with this novel, I can somehow respect how much Taylor commits to rendering Wallace s sadness and helplessness, given the enormous weight of the world he lives in.My first extreme disappointment with Real Life stems from how I feel like a lot of the problematic and oppressive things within the novel are not addressed in a way that really calls them out For example, when Wallace first meets Roman, a character who is extremely cruel, he thinks to himself Roman is very handsome so blond that Wallace thinks he cannot be naturally so But his eyelashes are blond, his eyebrows are blond, and his beard is mostly a white yellow and I just thought to myself, this is so much internalized racism, this glorification of blondness and this association between whiteness and beauty Yet this internalized racism was never really addressed or dealt with in a way that a reader would later think, oh okay, that was internalized racism, blondness and whiteness doesn t actually equal beauty Another example of this lack of addressing problematic and oppressive things includes Wallace s relationship romantic with Miller Throughout the book though especially toward the end, Miller treats Wallace pretty poorly, culminating in a scene that reads very much like a view spoiler direct sexual assault, when Miller forcefully penetrates Wallace hide spoiler Yet this violence, as well as Miller s complicity in the racism of his fellow white friends toward Wallace, is never explicitly dealt with so much as portrayed, before Wallace resumes his relationship with Miller again and again When I reflect on their relationship further, it reminded me of a lot of gay male romances that I feel like are written with beautiful language, yet ultimately are really unhealthy and emotionally and or physically unsatisfying or abusive.And this lack of growth gets to the core of my main frustration with this novel Wallace never really gets better I think this may reflect a fundamental subjectivity about what makes a novel good Because I can see how some would say, well, sometimes you encounter tons of racism and you engage in unhealthy and borderline abusive relationships and you stick with a group of actively and passively racist white people, and that s that But for me, when I read books, I do value some sign of character development, some sign of healing or empowerment I m not saying I expected Wallace to like, renounce all the racism he encounters and become super self loving and move cleanly and neatly toward a better career trajectory Again, I get that sometimes life is shitty and people cope in ways that are self condemning Yet, one of the things I value in fiction and I m not necessarily saying anyone else has to value this is the ability to render the world as different than it actually is, oftentimes through characters who are able to slowly yet surely work toward things like fighting internalized racism, letting go of unhealthy relationships, loving themselves I frankly didn t see much if any of that from Wallace, which was a bummer.Overall, not the book for me, though others on this site have enjoyed it so I think it s fair to read their reviews too I definitely have experienced and witnessed racism from within the gay community, though I m also a non black queer person of color, so I recognize I may not be the book s intended audience anyway I did care about Wallace, though I always felt frustrated with the lack of movement in the novel, even when layers of trauma were uncovered and grievances in relationships occurred and occurred Contemplative and absorbing, Real Life reflects on what it means to live authentically Unfolding over the course of a single summer weekend in a Midwestern college town, the story follows Wallace, a reticent biochem grad student, as he nears an existential breakdown His father has recently passed, he finds academia stultifying, and, as a queer Black man in an overwhelmingly white space, he finds himself estranged from his friends and labmates, subject to constant microaggressions and overt rac Contemplative and absorbing, Real Life reflects on what it means to live authentically Unfolding over the course of a single summer weekend in a Midwestern college town, the story follows Wallace, a reticent biochem grad student, as he nears an existential breakdown His father has recently passed, he finds academia stultifying, and, as a queer Black man in an overwhelmingly white space, he finds himself estranged from his friends and labmates, subject to constant microaggressions and overt racist harassment Making things evencomplicated is his budding romance with a standoffish white peer he formerly resented and thought straight In mesmerizing prose Taylor fully renders Wallace s inner life, subtly capturing the ways he manages great stress and searches for a higher purpose in life There s a lot in here that s only lightly sketched, from Wallace s relationship with his father to the personalities of his friends, but the writing s compelling and promising Brandon Taylor s Real Life is indisputably one of the best novels of our generation, and I say this because it is true Do you know how wonderful it feels to be represented as a gay black man and by one of our own Next to living, it is precisely the most euphoric feeling in the world, and so it is with immense joy that I could be one of this book s earliest champions Because when it comes to realizing the anxieties and nuances of our humanity, Taylor has given life to a character gay literat Brandon Taylor s Real Life is indisputably one of the best novels of our generation, and I say this because it is true Do you know how wonderful it feels to be represented as a gay black man and by one of our own Next to living, it is precisely the most euphoric feeling in the world, and so it is with immense joy that I could be one of this book s earliest champions Because when it comes to realizing the anxieties and nuances of our humanity, Taylor has given life to a character gay literature has been hellbent on keeping in the shadows.A story as painfully pure as its name, Taylor s forthcoming debut Real Life illustrates all the grueling battles of so many gay black men like Wallace, the nucleus of this story, who endure the lonesome journey for shelter and mercy under the false claim of acceptance Wallace learns this lesson as a biochem graduate student in a Midwestern town when he s forced to face his predominantly white friend group and the peers with whom he encounters in academia, giving rise to a whole scourge of conflicts involving racism, queerbaiting, tokenism, white mediocrity, fragility, and entitlement These sufferings all feel a little less intolerable when a benevolent friend makes an unsuspectingly affectionate advance on Wallace, who timidly gives into whims and wants of his own But friendships, like the embrace of such sudden love, can only be a forcefield for so long until the burden of race, class, and expectation has its way.My entire life, as a gay black boy from the scraps of Michigan, I dreamt of the day I d write a story, my story this story Brandon has beaten me to the punch, but what a glorious sight it is to see another one of us leap across the finish line Much like the catharsis of Elio in front of that ungodly fireplace in Call Me by Your Name or how briskly my heart dissolved as Jack was slain in Brokeback Mountain, Real Life has the sort of cinematic charm to render any audience hot with tears.Saeed Jones, Danez Smith, and now Brandon Taylor My Charlie s Angels My Destiny s Child My beloveds Thank you all for keeping us alive If you liked my review, feel free to follow me parisperusing on Instagram. Named one of the most anticipated books of the year by Entertainment Weekly, Harper s Bazaar, BuzzFeed, andA novel of startling intimacy, violence, and mercy among friends in a Midwestern university town, from an electric new voice Almost everything about Wallace is at odds with the Midwestern university town where he is working uneasily toward a biochem degree An introverted young man from Alabama, black and queer, he has left behind his family without escaping the long shadows of his childhood For reasons of self preservation, Wallace has enforced a wary distance even within his own circle of friends some dating each other, some dating women, some feigning straightness But over the course of a late summer weekend, a series of confrontations with colleagues, and an unexpected encounter with an ostensibly straight, white classmate, conspire to fracture his defenses while exposing long hidden currents of hostility and desire within their community Real Life is a novel of profound and lacerating power, a story that asks if it s ever really possible to overcome our private wounds, and at what cost I can t figure out if it s me or the books I ve been reading, but I feel like I m in a bit of a reading slump after a strong beginning in 2020 It took me forever to read Real Life It s getting a fair bit of attention and is on several books to watch in 2020 lists, but I found it hard to keep focused on the narrative Wallace is an African American graduate student in biochemistry at a mid western university He comes from a brutal impoverished family in Alabama He is gay His father died rece I can t figure out if it s me or the books I ve been reading, but I feel like I m in a bit of a reading slump after a strong beginning in 2020 It took me forever to read Real Life It s getting a fair bit of attention and is on several books to watch in 2020 lists, but I found it hard to keep focused on the narrative Wallace is an African American graduate student in biochemistry at a mid western university He comes from a brutal impoverished family in Alabama He is gay His father died recently The story focuses on a weekend in Wallace s life amongst his classmates when his emotional life seems to unravel He feels out of place and misunderstood But there are no better places on the horizon The author paints an intimate portrait of alienation It s well written and delves deep into contemporary interpersonal dynamics, but I didn t feel very engaged by the story or the characters Perhaps it was too much of a micro emotional exploration for my current tastes Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for an opportunity to read an advance copy Longer review to come Thanks so much to Riverhead Books for the review copy, clearly I adored this book and I m so glad I got to read it. 4.25 stars Is it into this culture that he is to emerge Into the narrow, dark water of real life It had been awhile since I finished a book in one day or since I read a book that made me crybut once I started Real Life I simply couldn t stop, even if what I was reading made me mad, then sad, then mad again, and then sad all over again This is one heart wrenching novel Reading it was an immersive and all consuming experience I felt both secondhand anxiety, embarrassment, and anger, 4.25 stars Is it into this culture that he is to emerge Into the narrow, dark water of real life It had been awhile since I finished a book in one day or since I read a book that made me crybut once I started Real Life I simply couldn t stop, even if what I was reading made me mad, then sad, then mad again, and then sad all over again This is one heart wrenching novel Reading it was an immersive and all consuming experience I felt both secondhand anxiety, embarrassment, and anger, and theI read thefrustrated I became by my own impotencestill, I kept on reading, desperate to catch a glimpse of hope or happiness People can be unpredictable in their cruelty Taylor s riveting debut novel chronicles a graduate student s turbulent weekend At its heart, this is the Wallace s story Wallace is gay, black, painfully aware of his almost debilitating anxiety and of what he perceives as his physical and internal flaws As one the few black men in this unnamed Midwestern city, and the only black man in his course, Wallace knows that he is in a different position from his white friends After a childhood disrupted by poverty and many traumatic experiences, he withdraws into studies, dedicating most of his waking hours to lab tests and projects Yet, even if he works twice as hard as other students, many still imply directly and non that he was accepted into this program only because of his skin colour Perhaps friendship is really nothing but controlled cruelty Maybe that s all they re doing, lacerating each other and expecting kindness back Real Life has all the trappings of a campus novel From its confined setting of a university city in which we follow Wallace as he goes to a popular student hangout by the lake, to his uni s labs, to his or his friends apartments to its focus on the shifting alliances and power dynamics between a group of friends Yet, Taylor s novel also subverts some of this genre s characteristic The academic world is not as sheltering as one might first imagine Questioning real life vs student life becomes a leitmotif in the characters conversations Taylor s novel offers a muchless idyllic and romantic vision of the academic world than most other campus novels If anything we became aware of the way in which real life problems make their way into a student s realm Affection always feels this way for him, like an undue burden, like putting weight and expectation onto someone else As if affection were a kind of cruelty too From the very first pages we see Wallace s environment and friends through his alienated lenses While most of his friends are queer gay, bisexual, or an unspecified sexuality they are white and from farprivileged backgrounds At the beginning of the novel Wallace gives in and agrees to meet them by the lake, after having avoided them for a long period of time What unfolds is deeply uncomfortable to read In spite of their laughter and smiles, these people do not strike as friends Their banter is cutting, their off handed comments have sharp edges, and they are all incredibly and irresolutely selfish Taylor s quickly establishes the toxic dynamics between these friends While they might not be directly aggressive or hostile, they repeatedly hurt, belittle, betray, and undermine one other The distance Wallace feels from them is overwhelming Yet, even if he tries to be on the outskirts of their discussions, he finds himself having to deal with their racist or otherwise hurtful remarks Worst still, he is confronted with his friends cowardice when they feign that they do not say racist or demeaning things If anything they usually imply that he is the one who is oversensitive Over this weekend we see time and again just how horribly solipsistic and cowardly Wallace s friends are They mask their racism and elitism under a pretence of wokeness Similarly, one of Wallace s fellow students, believes that as a feminist she can be openly homophobic and racist, throwing around words such as misogynistic without thought or consequence in order to masquerade her own bigotry.Wallace s friends racism is farsurreptitious For the most part they pretend that race doesn t matter, and that is Wallace who makes a big deal out of nothing Yet, when someone say something discriminatory out loud, they do nothing.As he hangs out with his friends he finds himself noticing just how far from perfect they are A perfect or happy life seems unattainable Even moments of lightheartedness or contentment give way to arguments and disagreements within this group Even if what plagues Wallace s mind is fardisturbing than what his friends rather mundane worries regarding their future careers, current relationship etc he often chooses to comfort or simply listen to them, rather than pouring his own heart out Wallace knows that they couldn t possibly understand his relationship to his family and past He misses, maybe, also, other things, the weight of unnamed feelings moving through him And those feelings were transmuted into something cruel and mean.There was an economy to it, even when you couldn t see it at first, a shadow calculation running underneath all their lives While he may not voice his troubles while he is hanging out with his friends , Wallace s mind is often occupied with his own past and future Taylor does a terrific job in giving us an impression of Wallace s discordant psyche Moments of dissociation make him further retread within himself, escaping his uncomfortable surroundings Like Wallace we begin to see his surroundings as unpleasant and claustrophobic At times the people around him blur together, blending into a sea of white faces, making him feel all theisolated Wallace s own insecurities colour most of his thoughts, feelings, and actions Even when I could not understand him or in his moments of selfishness, I found myself caring for him and deeply affected by his circumstances What he experiencesis brutal When his coping mechanism work studying is threatened his mental health spirals out of control The halting and recursive dialogue is incredibly realistic Even when discussing seemingly ordinary things there is an underlying tension And there is almost a stop start quality to the characters conversations that struck me for its realism The way in which their arguments spiral into awkward silences, the tentative words that followheated ones, the impact of tone and interpretation A sense of physicality, of eroticism, pervades Taylor s narrative Characters are often compared to animals, close attention is paid to their bodies from their skin to their limbs and to the way the move and look by themselves and together as a group This attentiveness towards the body emphasises Wallace s own insecurity about the way he looks In one of hisbrooding moments he finds himself questioning whether he wants to be or be with an attractive guy His contemplations about same sex attraction definitely resonated with me Envy and desire are not mutually exclusive This is perhaps why people get together in the first place The sharing of time The sharing of the responsibility of anchoring oneself in the world Life is less terrible when you can just rest for a moment, put everything down and wait without having to worry about being washed away Taylor often contrasts seemingly opposing feelings For example, sensual moments are underpinned by a current of danger Wallace seems to find both force and vulnerability erotic Taylor s narrative repeatedly examines the tense boundaries between pleasure and pain, attraction and repulsion, tenderness and violence Taylor projects Wallace s anxiety, depression, and discomfort onto his narrative so that a feeling of unease underlines our reading experience He had considered himself a Midwesterner at heart, that being in the South and being gay were incompatible, that no two parts of a person could beincompatible But standing there, among the boats, shyly waiting to discover the people to whom he felt he would belong, he sensed the foolishness in that Taylor s prose could be in turns thoughtful and jarring There are disturbingly detailed descriptions about Wallace s lab work, unflinching forays into past traumas, and thrilling evocations of sexual desire A seemingly ordinary weekend shows us just how inescapable social hierarchies are The secular world of academia does not entirely succeed in keeping the real world at bay Depression, anxiety, dysphoria, the lingering effects of abuse all make their way into Wallace s story We read of his confusing desires, of his friends hypocrisy, of his own appetite for self destruction Real Life is not an easy read There were many horrible moments in which I wanted to jump into the narrative to shake Wallace s friends Wallace too, pained me In spite of his observant nature, he remains detached He picks up on his friends horrible behaviour but with one or two exceptions he does not oppose them Yet, I could also see why he remained passive Being in his position is exhausting It is a life spent swimming against the gradient, struggling up the channel of other people s cruelty It grates him to consider this, the shutting away of the part of him that now throbs and writhes like a new organ that senses so keenly the limitations of his life Even if I craved for areassuring ending I still think that this is an impressive debut novel one that strikingly renders what it feels to inhabit a black body in a white dominated environment Real Life tackles racism, privilege, cruelty, cultural and power dynamics, and the complexities of sexual desire head on Wallace s friends are aggravating if not downright despicable Which is perhaps why when alongside Wallace we glimpse some kindness in them, it makes us all theupset.Reading Real Life made me uncomfortable, angry, sad Lines like these, He typically brings crackers or another form of fiber because his friends are all full of shit and need cleaning out from time to time , even made me laugh out loud What I m trying to say, or write is this this is a brilliant novel, one you should definitely read with some caution, of course.Anyhow, I can t wait to readby Taylor.Readreviews on my blog View all my reviews on Goodreads This is one of the best books I ve read in a while, spread out over a few days because I was worried I d finish it too quickly The author uses some of his own experiences as a gay science grad student who is also a person of color The character Wallace questions the white apology, how much we have to bring in from our past, and how sure we have to be of our life direction I feel like I m not doing it justice, still wrapping my head around it, but definitely felt the intensity of this read.And This is one of the best books I ve read in a while, spread out over a few days because I was worried I d finish it too quickly The author uses some of his own experiences as a gay science grad student who is also a person of color The character Wallace questions the white apology, how much we have to bring in from our past, and how sure we have to be of our life direction I feel like I m not doing it justice, still wrapping my head around it, but definitely felt the intensity of this read.And it s not just the story, it s the writing Here are a few examples Sympathy was a kind of ventriloquism The entire two pages about the past, something the narrator is telling someone else but you only really know that in the next section And something I get the impression he wants to believe but has not experienced in reality When you go to another place you don t have to carry the past with you The past doesn t need a future It has no use for what comes next The past is greedy, always swallowing you up, always taking I can t live as long as my past does It s one or the other Sorry and white apologies and guilt without it changing you, etc Just because you say you re sorry, or you say that someone doesn t deserve something, does not erase the facts of what has or has not happened, or who has or has not acted Wallace is tired And then a pretty amazing moment where he s on the other side of sorry, which I won t quote but is riveting.Read it, read it, read it.TW for sexual assault FINAL REVIEW Real Life follows Wallace, a young Black and queer Biochemistry student enrolled in a predominantly white school and living in a predominantly white town Throughout the novel, I was burning with a quiet rage due to the circumstances Wallace finds himself placed in, such as being on the receiving end of casual racism A fascinating dynamic is that several of the casual racist remarks Wallace endures comes from his circle of white friends Taylor does an excellent job of showcasin FINAL REVIEW Real Life follows Wallace, a young Black and queer Biochemistry student enrolled in a predominantly white school and living in a predominantly white town Throughout the novel, I was burning with a quiet rage due to the circumstances Wallace finds himself placed in, such as being on the receiving end of casual racism A fascinating dynamic is that several of the casual racist remarks Wallace endures comes from his circle of white friends Taylor does an excellent job of showcasing why Wallace, a passive character, feels helpless during these situations, he s a character without a voice I could relate As a person who grew up in a predominantly white suburb and attended a mostly white school, this made for some really uncomfortable reading I loved that Taylor was not afraid of making Wallace unlikable and problematic at times It would have been far too tempting to write him as an all suffering angelic martyr He s frustratingly selfish at times.Another prevalent theme is the complex notion of sexuality And what exactly is sexuality anyway Here are all the roles sexuality takes on within this text There is the liberation, confusion, and shame of sexuality the nervousness about sexuality the curiosities of sexualities other than ones own the sexual pain, pleasure, neediness, danger, and selfishness, too The plotlines depicting these themes are graphic, volatile, intricate, but most importantly, worthy of deep analysis From the moment Wallace s weekend love affair begins, we know that it is all wrong It s possessive and problematic and will inevitably head into calatimous territory Reading about it may mess up your moral compass, have you questioning what exactly is it that you re witnessing Who is the villain in this story Are there only villains Are there no villains at all Oh and read this book for the painfully awkward dinner party scene Oof In awe.https www.instagram.com p BVGeN1Ak Real Life


About the Author: Brandon Taylor

Brandon Taylor is the senior editor of Electric Literature s Recommended Reading and a staff writer at Literary Hub His writing has received fellowships from Lambda Literary Foundation, Kimbilio Fiction, and the Tin House Summer Writer s Workshop He holds graduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin Madison and the University of Iowa, where he was an Iowa Arts Fellow at the Iowa Writers Workshop in fiction.


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